Thursday, 10 August 2017

What's New in Genealogy Books at English Public Libraries

The following genealogy books published in 2017, available at a selection of  public libraries in England, are listed in order of number of libraries in which they are to be found  or are on order (in parenthesis). Libraries of which the catalogues were consulted are Birmingham, Cornwall, Essex, Gloucestershire, Hampshire, Herefordshire, Norfolk, and North Yorkshire. Liverpool and Shropshire were without any 2017 genealogy publications listed in their catalogues.

(6) Tracing your pre-Victorian ancestors : a guide to research methods for family historians
Wintrip, John
Barnsley, South Yorkshire : Pen & Sword Family History, 2017.

( 4) A dictionary of family history : the genealogists' ABC / 2017.
Scott, Jonathan

(3) Tracing your army ancestors : a guide for family historians
Fowler, Simon
Third edition.
Barnsley, South Yorkshire : Pen & Sword Family History, 2017

(2) My European family : the first 54,000 years
Bojs, Karin
London : Bloomsbury Sigma, 2017.

(2 )Tracing your ancestors' lives: a guide to social history for family historians/ 2017.
Starmans, Barbara J.

(2) Tracing villains and their victims : a guide to criminal ancestors for family historians
Oates, Jonathan
Barnsley, South Yorkshire : Pen & Sword Family History, 2017.

(2) A woven silence
By Hayes-McCoy, Felicity, author
Large print. English. Published Oxford: ISIS, 2017

(1) Tracing your Church of England ancestors / 2017.
Raymond, Stuart A., 1945-

(1) The Ellis family in Cornwall
By MacKenzie, Charlotte
Book. English. Published Truro: Cornwall history, 2017

(1) The bad-ass librarians of Timbuktu and their race to save the world's most precious manuscripts
By Hammer, Joshua, 1957- author
Book. English. Published New York: Simon & Schuster Paperbacks, 2017

BONUS: Find a list of the most borrowed books, none non- fiction, from UK public libraries for the first half of 2017 at www.thebookseller.com/news/night-school-casts-shadow-over-libscan-chart-607901.

1 comment:

Anonymous said...

Oh, now, criminals and their victims sounds awfully interesting. Cheers, BT